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    vintageshopgirl:

Dog delivery.

    vintageshopgirl:

    Dog delivery.

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    writersnoonereads:

No one reads “the sandwich-man of the Beyond.” 

Joseph Péladan was born in Lyons, in 1858, into a milieu obsessed with occultism…In 1884 Péladan imposed himself on the Parisian public by publishing Le Vice Supreme, a fantastic mystico-erotic novel in which poetry alternates with a no less studied prose: ‘Faithful to your monstrous vice, O daughter of da Vinci, corrupting Muse of the aesthetics of evil, your smile may fade from the canvas, but it is engraved for ever in my heart.’
Péladan, who changed his name from Joseph to Joséphin, described himself as ‘the sandwich-man of the Beyond,’ exhumed a mystical society founded in Germany in the late Middle Ages, declared himself its leader, and crowned himself Sar Merodac, a title which enabled him to dress himself up in a costume reminiscent of Lohengrin and Nebuchadnezzar. He was a dark, handsome man, with bushy hair and a bushy beard, ready to swallow — and utter — all sorts of nonsense. In the despairing Paris of his day, which he convinced of its decadence, Barbey d’Aurevilly sang his praises, and young men such as Jean Lorrain and d’Annunzio copied him… Péladan obtained immediate fame, drawing on two sources from which all those who were disgusted with materialism would drink: occultism and aestheticism. His books came out in rapid succession, under the general title La Decadence Latine.

The text comes from Dreamers of Decadence by Philippe Jullian and the post idea and image from Strange Flowers. There’s also a blog (in English) devoted to Péladan. I think I would prefer reading a biography — especially if it was titled “The Sandwich-Man of the Beyond” — rather than any of the 19 volumes of La Decadence Latine (never translated into English as far as I know).
@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

    writersnoonereads:

    No one reads “the sandwich-man of the Beyond.” 

    Joseph Péladan was born in Lyons, in 1858, into a milieu obsessed with occultism…In 1884 Péladan imposed himself on the Parisian public by publishing Le Vice Supreme, a fantastic mystico-erotic novel in which poetry alternates with a no less studied prose: ‘Faithful to your monstrous vice, O daughter of da Vinci, corrupting Muse of the aesthetics of evil, your smile may fade from the canvas, but it is engraved for ever in my heart.’

    Péladan, who changed his name from Joseph to Joséphin, described himself as ‘the sandwich-man of the Beyond,’ exhumed a mystical society founded in Germany in the late Middle Ages, declared himself its leader, and crowned himself Sar Merodac, a title which enabled him to dress himself up in a costume reminiscent of Lohengrin and Nebuchadnezzar. He was a dark, handsome man, with bushy hair and a bushy beard, ready to swallow — and utter — all sorts of nonsense. In the despairing Paris of his day, which he convinced of its decadence, Barbey d’Aurevilly sang his praises, and young men such as Jean Lorrain and d’Annunzio copied him… Péladan obtained immediate fame, drawing on two sources from which all those who were disgusted with materialism would drink: occultism and aestheticism. His books came out in rapid succession, under the general title La Decadence Latine.

    The text comes from Dreamers of Decadence by Philippe Jullian and the post idea and image from Strange Flowers. There’s also a blog (in English) devoted to Péladan. I think I would prefer reading a biography — especially if it was titled “The Sandwich-Man of the Beyond” — rather than any of the 19 volumes of La Decadence Latine (never translated into English as far as I know).

    @WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

  3. text
    mirabilia-provocateur:

| Automaton In Repose |
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 Easter Elephants c. 1937

     Easter Elephants c. 1937

    (Source: vintagegal, via weirdvintage)

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    weirdvintage:

In 1932, Dr. Archibald Purves from England designed the Dynasphere.  He believed that one huge wheel encompassing five passengers was far more efficient than a car with four wheels.  The biggest issue was that it steered quite poorly.  (via)

    weirdvintage:

    In 1932, Dr. Archibald Purves from England designed the Dynasphere.  He believed that one huge wheel encompassing five passengers was far more efficient than a car with four wheels.  The biggest issue was that it steered quite poorly.  (via)

    (via weirdvintage)

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    weirdvintage:

Mother cat stops traffic, New York, July 1925 

    weirdvintage:

    Mother cat stops traffic, New York, July 1925 

    (Source: weirdvintage, via weirdvintage)

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    weirdvintage:

Simmons College, an all-female institution, had a tradition of “Freshman-Junior Weddings”, in which the Freshman class president dressed as the bride, and the Junior class president dressed as the groom.  Here are other Junior classmates dressed in drag, c. 1930s (via)

    weirdvintage:

    Simmons College, an all-female institution, had a tradition of “Freshman-Junior Weddings”, in which the Freshman class president dressed as the bride, and the Junior class president dressed as the groom.  Here are other Junior classmates dressed in drag, c. 1930s (via)

    (via weirdvintage)

  8. lifesimpermanence:

    vintage horrors

    (via incorrectapus)

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I like found objects, funny signs, interesting dead people and odd Victoriana.

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