1. text
    19thcenturyswagger:

Caught short? (source: http://ift.tt/10dkoCu)

    19thcenturyswagger:

    Caught short?

    (source: http://ift.tt/10dkoCu)

  2. text
    myimaginarybrooklyn:

nemfrog:
La mauvaise étoile. The bad star.  Les étoiles. 1849.

    myimaginarybrooklyn:

    nemfrog:

    La mauvaise étoile. The bad star.  Les étoiles. 1849.

    (via incorrectapus)

  3. text
    archiemcphee:

This awesomely terrifying monstrosity is one of the world’s oldest surviving jack-o’-lanterns. It was carved from a turnip during the 19th century, but we think it looks like something that could’ve been created by Edmund Blackadder’s faithful Baldrick, known for his love of turnips. It’s currently on display at the Museum of Country Life in County Mayo, Ireland.
According to IrishCentral, Irish folklore claims the custom of carving jack-o’-lanterns at Halloween originated in Ireland, where turnips, mangelwurzel or beets were supposedly used before pumpkins came into play:

As the tale goes, a man called Stingy Jack invited the devil for a drink and convinced him to shape-shift into a coin to pay with. When the devil obliged, Jack decided he wanted the coin for other purposes, and kept it in his pocket beside a small, silver cross to prevent it from turning back into the devil.
Jack eventually freed the devil under the condition that he wouldn’t bother Jack for one year, and wouldn’t claim Jack’s soul once he died. The next year, Jack tricked the devil once more by convincing him to climb up a tree to fetch a piece of fruit. When he was up in the tree, Jack carved a cross into the trunk so the devil couldn’t come down until he swore he wouldn’t bother Stingy Jack for another ten years.
When Jack died, God wouldn’t allow him into heaven and the devil wouldn’t allow him into hell. He was instead sent into the eternal night, with a burning coal inside a carved-out turnip to light his way. He’s been roaming the earth ever since. The Irish began to refer to this spooky figure as “Jack of the Lantern,” which then became “Jack O’Lantern.”

Head over to IrishCentral to learn more about this spooky piece of Halloween history.
[via io9]

    archiemcphee:

    This awesomely terrifying monstrosity is one of the world’s oldest surviving jack-o’-lanterns. It was carved from a turnip during the 19th century, but we think it looks like something that could’ve been created by Edmund Blackadder’s faithful Baldrick, known for his love of turnips. It’s currently on display at the Museum of Country Life in County Mayo, Ireland.

    According to IrishCentral, Irish folklore claims the custom of carving jack-o’-lanterns at Halloween originated in Ireland, where turnips, mangelwurzel or beets were supposedly used before pumpkins came into play:

    As the tale goes, a man called Stingy Jack invited the devil for a drink and convinced him to shape-shift into a coin to pay with. When the devil obliged, Jack decided he wanted the coin for other purposes, and kept it in his pocket beside a small, silver cross to prevent it from turning back into the devil.

    Jack eventually freed the devil under the condition that he wouldn’t bother Jack for one year, and wouldn’t claim Jack’s soul once he died. The next year, Jack tricked the devil once more by convincing him to climb up a tree to fetch a piece of fruit. When he was up in the tree, Jack carved a cross into the trunk so the devil couldn’t come down until he swore he wouldn’t bother Stingy Jack for another ten years.

    When Jack died, God wouldn’t allow him into heaven and the devil wouldn’t allow him into hell. He was instead sent into the eternal night, with a burning coal inside a carved-out turnip to light his way. He’s been roaming the earth ever since. The Irish began to refer to this spooky figure as “Jack of the Lantern,” which then became “Jack O’Lantern.”

    Head over to IrishCentral to learn more about this spooky piece of Halloween history.

    [via io9]

  4. text
    19thcenturyswagger:

Tweed life - Victorian gym (source: http://ift.tt/1sQwzQd)

    19thcenturyswagger:

    Tweed life - Victorian gym

    (source: http://ift.tt/1sQwzQd)

  5. thisbelongsinamuseum:

    If you’ve been religiously following this blog for the past month (which is probably, like, two of you) then you know how much I love visiting cemeteries. Nothing really creeps me out too much, except when I see those bricked-up mausoleums, which basically means it is filled to capacity or they don’t expect anyone else to be buried in it. Anyway, remember when I told you about the grave of a young girl named Inez Clarke? Well, there is an equally creepy one down in Alabama.

    A 10 minute detour off I-85 brings you to Oakwood Cemetery in the town of Lanett, a typical burial ground in that the markers are flat and pretty much all the same. But there is one resting place that stands out, probably because it doesn’t look like a grave at all. In December of 1933, four-year-old Nadine Earles wanted nothing but a playhouse for Christmas. Her father started on it, but she became sick with diphtheria, which turned into pneumonia. Her parents gave her a tea set and life-size doll, hoping it would help make her feel better, but all she just wanted was the playhouse. Nadine told her father, “Me want it now.” She passed away December 18th, right before Christmas. The playhouse was not yet finished. But her father hired a contractor to build it over her tombstone and filled it with her toys, a bike, and of course the little tea set. When looking through the windows of the house, visitors can still see the items, including newer toys, which makes it even more creepy. 

    Nadine’s family continued to visit her playhouse over the years, as seen in the black and white photo above from 1945. Her parents are buried right outside of it. Peering through the windows of the playhouse, visitors can sort of make out her gravestone. It reads:

    'Our Darling Little Girl
    Sweetest In The World
    April 3, 1929
    December 18, 1933
    Little Nadine Earles
    In Heaven We Hope To Meet
    Me Want It Now’


    (Image Source 1 & 2)

  6. text
    19thcenturyswagger:

Three Yale men in drag; probably members of “Dramat”, the theatrical society founded in 1900. Yale men were famous for this - The New Haven newspaper even lamented that “no woman is as beautiful as a Yale man impersonating femininity”. In 1915, The Yale Dean of College forbade students to play female roles for more than one season. :) (source: http://ift.tt/1sD7327)

    19thcenturyswagger:

    Three Yale men in drag; probably members of “Dramat”, the theatrical society founded in 1900. Yale men were famous for this - The New Haven newspaper even lamented that “no woman is as beautiful as a Yale man impersonating femininity”. In 1915, The Yale Dean of College forbade students to play female roles for more than one season. :)

    (source: http://ift.tt/1sD7327)

  7. text
    thisbelongsinamuseum:

Sorry for today’s late post. Sometimes life keeps you busy and away from all things internet. But speaking of the interwebs, did you know there is an actual tumblr dedicated to one of the creepiest things you can ever see at a museum? Yes, I’m talking about the mannequin. No one knows for sure why it exists. Whether used in random historic recreations or some medical experiment gone wrong, the figures are just plain creepy. Anyway, here’s ventriloquist Alan Stainer (and friend) of ‘The Gaieties’ from around 1910. It’s a photographic postcard from the Beatrice Kerr collection at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. Although Kerr was a champion swimmer, she was also a vaudeville performer so that might explain why she would have such an item in her possession. I guess she didn’t mind the creepiness. Oh, and speaking of ventriloquists..don’t forget the Vent Haven Museum is dedicated to the stagecraft with over 700 scary figures staring back at you, plus thousands of photos, playbills and books. Sweet dreams, y’all!

    thisbelongsinamuseum:

    Sorry for today’s late post. Sometimes life keeps you busy and away from all things internet. But speaking of the interwebs, did you know there is an actual tumblr dedicated to one of the creepiest things you can ever see at a museum? Yes, I’m talking about the mannequin. No one knows for sure why it exists. Whether used in random historic recreations or some medical experiment gone wrong, the figures are just plain creepy. Anyway, here’s ventriloquist Alan Stainer (and friend) of ‘The Gaieties’ from around 1910. It’s a photographic postcard from the Beatrice Kerr collection at the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney. Although Kerr was a champion swimmer, she was also a vaudeville performer so that might explain why she would have such an item in her possession. I guess she didn’t mind the creepiness. Oh, and speaking of ventriloquists..don’t forget the Vent Haven Museum is dedicated to the stagecraft with over 700 scary figures staring back at you, plus thousands of photos, playbills and books. Sweet dreams, y’all!

  8. text
    weirdvintage:

This appears to be prop stocks in a photographer’s studio, late Victorian (via MugshotsandMiscellaneous)

    weirdvintage:

    This appears to be prop stocks in a photographer’s studio, late Victorian (via MugshotsandMiscellaneous)

  9. text
    sparism:

nends:

The ghosts’ photo-album - Unknown author - http://www.musee-orsay.fr/

up looking meets down hanging

    sparism:

    nends:

    The ghosts’ photo-album - Unknown author - http://www.musee-orsay.fr/

    up looking meets down hanging

    (via 19thcenturyswagger)

  10. sixpenceee:

    VICTORIAN MOURNING JEWELRY 

    During the Victorian era, it was common to wear “mourning jewelry”. This jewelry typically included hair from deceased loved one.

    The deceased loved one’s hair would be carefully arranged within the brooch, often creating intricate pictures or designs.

    Hair was considered to be an ideal keepsake, since it does not break down over time.

    SIMILAR POSTS

    (via teasingfool)

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I like found objects, funny signs, interesting dead people and odd Victoriana.

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